Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Delmes & Zander at INDEPENDENT NY, 2017

DISKO GIRLS (Anonymous), untitled, 1970s-80s, crayon on paper, Courtesy Delmes & Zander

Delmes & Zander presents
DISKO GIRLS (Anonymous)
at INDEPENDENT, NY 2-5 March 2017
 

At this year's edition of the Independent New York, Delmes & Zander will present Disko Girls, an anonymous portfolio comprising 50 erotic drawings, all of which completed on DIN A4 format sheets of paper (8,3 x 11,7 in) with crayon and pencil. Despite thorough research it has not been possible to identify the artist behind these drawings, found in Germany in the late 1990's. It is assumed that the portfolio represents only a mere fraction of a complete oeuvre dedicated to a self-same theme pursued over a longer period of time. The name Disko Girls has been attributed to the work out of respect for the unnamed and unknown author. Delmes & Zander will show these works in the unquestionable belief that the intrinsic artistic process, the unique quality and the distinctive signature of the works clearly define and validate them in their artistic value.

The work can be dated back to the 1970s/ 1980s and clearly resorts to both the aesthetics and the iconography of a pop cultural language rooted in its time. Music plays a crucial role as does the aura of the female pop star with her microphone as seen on television (the most popular German music television series was the ZDF-Hitparade depicted in the drawings) or in a magazine, or the pop fan illustrated in her bedroom, listening to her favorite songs on her tape recorder or flicking through her vinyl record collection, by the imagination of her creator. In a curious psychedelic visual realm fuelled by naive fandom and populated by sexy girls, the pastel worlds of Disko Girls (Anonymous) epitomize desire, glamour and candy-colored fantasies at times reminiscent of the work of Aurie Ramirez. Disko Girls (Anonymous)has recently been included into the gallery’s program and will be introduced for the very first time to the public here at the Independent in New York.

Delmes & Zander will show at the Independent Brussels in April (19.-23.) featuring works by keyboard rock star icon Wesley Willis in an exhibition entitled Rock'N'Roll Superhighway picking up once again on the theme of music at the heart of Disko Girls (Anonymous) the gallery's presentation at the Independent New York earlier in the year.

We look forward to your visit on 5th Floor!
www.independenthq.com

Tuesday, 14 February 2017

"HIPKISS: YES, BUT NO." Opening on Friday! Delmes & Zander I Berlin

HIPKISS, Yes But No But, 2014, mixed media on paper, 59 x 118cm

Delmes & Zander I Berlin presents

Hipkiss:Yes, but No.

February 17 – April 15, 2017
Opening: Friday, 17.2., 6–9 pm

In the exhibition Hipkiss: Yes, but No. Delmes and Zander is showing for the first time at the Berlin space a selection of works by the British artist duo Hipkiss including five pieces from their most recent series, “The Towers.”

Initiated in early 2015, „The Towers” is a series of graphite drawings on long sheets of paper (approx. 40 x 225 cm) in which the look of the Hipkiss-landscape is taken yet another step further by way of newly explored dynamic processes in creation. The drawings reveal a more abstract yet concentrated visual language in which details are distilled without the distraction of a more complicated, continuous backdrop. By organically working their way from the axis within the circular limits, the magically vertiginous effect of the drawings is accentuated. As is emblematic of Hipkiss, the works feature human-made structures placed against - or within - natural landscapes, intricately intertwined and almost hybrid, whilst at the same time curiously out of place. “The Towers”-landscapes work at both close range and from a distance, individually and collectively as a whole.
They have become Hipkiss' primary ongoing project since and mark a more mature phase in their artistic development, where the alter egos used by Hipkiss in the past have naturally shifted from the glammed-up, youthful figures to more abstract and natural forms.

Hipkiss have also pointed to the overt political meaning of their most recent work: “Reflecting a year - 2016 - in which it could be said that masculine forces have enjoyed a resurgence of power in the Western world, the many feminine symbols to be found in the drawings coalesce, in our minds, to combat the attempted coup; it is a paean to solidarity and righteous rage.”

Alongside “The Towers”, the exhibition will show a selection of smaller works on paper and the seminal “L.I.E.” - series (an acronym for "London In Europe") in which Hipkiss dissect the ambiguity of the British identity within Europe – a prophetical series in view of recent developments in the U.K. and the Brexit debate.

Hipkiss are Chris and Alpha Mason (both *1964). They have steadily worked as equal partners on inventing and reinventing their symbolic language together since 1983, with each of their strands of creativity – Alpha in writing and Chris in drawing – culminating in a singular and distinctive visual style. The landscapes they envision abound in intricate details and equivocal organic forms which, in the artists' words, unfold as if by happenstance in a collaborative creative process continuously shaped by an ongoing exchange of ideas and techniques. Wordplay is also recurrent in the work of Hipkiss and an essential formal element in their narrative mode. For many years, Hipkiss have refined their use and understanding of graphite (and graphite over silver ink) on paper as their primary media, but have occasionally also included other materials - such as the metal leaf and tape seen in “The Towers”. The result is an impressive oeuvre that is both meaningful and strikingly beautiful.

The work of Hipkiss can be found in the following collections: the John Michael Kohler Arts Center (US-WI), Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen (Netherlands), The Whitworth (UK), FRAC Picardie (France), the American Folk Art Museum (US-NY); and in the private collections of Cindy Sherman, Antoine de Galbert and Arnulf Rainer. Hipkiss has featured in solo shows at Intuit, John Michael Kohler Arts Center, group shows at the Tate Britain, Whitechapel, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, La Maison Rouge, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art and David Zwirner, and international art fairs, including Art Basel, Frieze London, Art Forum Berlin and Open Space (solo booth) at Art Cologne.

www.delmes-zander.de

Friday, 3 February 2017

"The Road Less Traveled" exhibition series at John Michael Kohler Art Center

EUGENE VON BRUENCHENHEIN, untitled, 1940-50s, Vintage Gelatin Silver Print,
25 x 16cm, Courtesy Delmes & Zander

The Road Less Traveled
- John Michael Kohler Arts Center begins yearlong
interdisciplinary exploration of artist-built environments

Opening Night on Sat, Feb. 25, 2017 / 7:00-10:00 pm.

including works by
Emery Blagdon, Loy Bowlin, Nek Chand, Eddie Owens Martin, Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, and many others.

In celebration of its 50th anniversary, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center presents The Road Less Traveled, a yearlong series of 15 exhibitions exploring the multifaceted and unique field of artist-built environments. This series draws deeply from the Arts Center's world-renowned collection, offering the opportunity to experience the work of art-environment builders including Emery Blagdon, Loy Bowlin, Nek Chand, Eddie Owens Martin, Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, and many others.

In addition, THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED incorporates new writing and works of art produced by scholars, curators, musicians, and theorists from wide-ranging disciplines in response to art environments. Through connecting its collection with internationally respected thinkers, the Arts Center aims to expand the conversation surrounding this compelling art form.

www.jmkac.org

Wednesday, 1 February 2017

DAMN°s imm Cologne Guide featuring "ONE/OTHER"


PAUL HUMPHREY, Andrea Lee Asleep, undated, mixed media on paper, 28 x 21,5 cm, Courtesy Delmes & Zander
DAMN° imm Cologne Guide 2017, p.52.

Our current exhibition "ONE/OTHER Self-portraits and Portraits" is featured in DAMN magazine's Cologne city guide 2017. Only one more week left, so don't miss it!

"ONE/OTHER - Self-Portraits and Portraits"
through Feb 4, 2017

feat. Morton Bartlett, Miroslav Tichy, Alexander Lobanov, Eugene von Bruenchenhein, Margret - Chronic einer Affäre, Type 42, Paul Humphrey and many more

Delmes & Zander | Cologne - Antwerpener Str.1, 50670 Cologne
Delmes & Zander | Berlin - Rosa-Luxemburg-Str. 37, 10178 Berlin
 

Friday, 27 January 2017

Do Outsider Artists Really Exist?

MICHAIL PAULE, untitled, 1930-37, 35 x 26,5cm, Courtesy Delmes & Zander

Do Outsider Artists Really Exist?

Anthony Haden-Guest about Outsider Art
on artnet news at January 22, 2016

"Days before the Outsider Art Fair opened in New York, artist Joe Coleman was on a panel at NeueHouse, a venue on East 25th which describes itself alarmingly as a “machine for creating.” The supposed theme was Killing Time: The Chronology of Creativity, which sounded enticing, but Coleman, black-bearded and glittery-waist-coated, was in tip-top form, so the discussion—like the screen behind the panelists and the questions from the audience in front of them—focused soon enough on Outsider art.

This is a classification which Coleman went on to denounce as condescending. “I love Henry Darger and Adolf Wofli,” he told the audience. “They are great artists. They aren’t Outsider artists. There’s only good art and bad art.”

Nobody took him up on this. I admire Joe Coleman’s work enormously so I’ll engage with the thorny topic here and now.

There’s a famous story that illuminates the relationship between the Modernists and Outsider artists and it comes from the very beginnings of Modernism. Picasso reportedly bought a canvas by Henri Rousseau in a Paris flea market possibly as early as 1900. In 1908 he threw a banquet for Rousseau which has been described in sometimes hilarious detail. The coats were flung into Juan Gris’s studio, Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas were around, there was prodigious drinking; apparently Marie Laurencin got so naughty that Guillaume Apollinaire had to send her home.

It’s clear that Picasso and the young Modernists thought the retired toll-taker was somewhat a holy fool, and, yes, they were condescending, but it’s also clear that they hugely admired his work for its authenticity, its visual inventiveness. And that, as with the African masks they were also looking at, had raw energy, just the energy they needed for their project of dynamiting the salon. (The Picasso banquet was a huge boost to Rousseau’s career as well.)

Outsider art still has that special energy. You could see it, an unmistakeable difference, in the images onscreen at the NeueHouse. Artists like Darger, Wofli and yes, Coleman are different from mainstreamers, but not just because they are schizophrenics (as was Wofli) or have bizarre drives (as most certainly did Darger). Outsider artists are not ‘outside’ just in the sense of being untaught, or disadvantaged, but because they and their work operate outside the Great Game of the art world. And, most important, unlike almost all professional artists, who turn out a fair amount of product—yes, I do include you, Picasso—they mean every thing they do, every single piece they make.

Which is precisely why Outsider art is a focus of such interest right now, a time when a whole new cast of slick derivative tricksters is dominating the artscape. Yes, folks, there’s a whole new Salon out there. That is why prices of the great Outsiders are skyrocketing, and it is why Coleman is perfectly correct in his belief that they belong with the other greats. And they will, in time, join them. Which is also, by the way, why we are seeing a surge of faux, unfelt Outsiderism into the marketplace. But that is an old, old, always depressing story. (...)

Read more on artnet
news.artnet.com

Known/Unknown at MUSEUM OF SEX, NY





exhibition views "Known/Unknown" at Museum of Sex, New York, 2017 photocredits Lissa Rivera

"KNOWN/UNKNOWN"
Private Obsession and Hidden Desire in Outsider Art
at the Museum of Sex New York

January 19, 2017 – September 16, 2017

featuring works by
Morton Bartlett, Eugene von Bruenchenhein, Henry Darger, Thornton Dial, Aurie Ramirez, Miroslav Tichý, Edwin Lawson, Johann Korec, Johann Garber, Royal Robertson and many more

read more here:
www.museumofsex.com
 

Friday, 20 January 2017

JESUIS CRYSTIANO at Warhus Ritterhaus, Cologne

JESUIS CRYSTIANO, untitled, pencil on paper, 2012, Courtesy Delmes & Zander

We highly recommend the exhibition "Untitled #3"
at Warhus Rittershaus featuring Bill Adams, Claus Böhmler, Jesuis Crystiano and Joe Neave

Untitled #3
January 21 – March 4, 2017
Opening Friday, January 20, 2017, 6-9pm
Warhus Rittershaus, Cologne

"As of today, no one has ever claimed that the death of drawing was here. The drawing has long enjoyed an excellent reputation. In the opinion of some, it was not born as a hardliner of art history, but certainly since the times of Leonardo da Vinci, if not before, it has been highly esteemed and may do almost anything it pleases. Imagine, if you will, a revival of the disegno colore debate: today, drawing would be the clear winner of such a contest, more than ever. Drawing is highly popular. It fulfills needs because it is direct, genuine and 'true'. Drawing is the most liberal and free of all genres, even if it has only been considered as a seperate entity in the theory of art since the modern age.

In the Renaissance it was considered the origin, the source, the mother and the father of painting, sculpture and architecture. Not for nothing were these three titans of artistic genres called the "arti del disegno" ("the arts of drawing"). Right up until the advent of the modern period, the drawing served as the base of the 'actual' work of art, and hovered in the atmosphere of the practical result as it's "transcendental principle" [Friedrich Teja Bach, Wolfram Pichler (eds.), Öffnungen. Zur Theorie und Geschichte der Zeichnung, Munich 2009, p.16.]. It was only in the modern age that the drawing became established as an unconditional and self-sufficient purpose in itself. Drawing therefore was and is always present, it is exempt from the progress of time and not subject to fashions. It is always justified, does not have to assert itself and does not constantly reinvent itself. It's initial rawness makes it even more seductive, in line with sentimental desires. Only paper and pen are necesseary to the genius, the talented hand can show it's virtuosity in a streak on the white. It is in this romaticised form in which drawing is usually consumed by the viewer: as the genius, magical trace through which we feel close to the draftsman, as if he had just 'finished'.

However, the real achievement of drawing is the mark of the figure of thought as the actualized idea! With infantile ease, drawing can formulate any kind of criticism, theory, humor, hypocrisy, and absurdity so clearly, all without necessarily making a commitment or even actually submitting to form. With radical frankness, drawing speaks a direct language, which constructs nonchalantly invented, reinterpreted, and paraphrased worlds. The drawing communicates virtually without any restraint, as if the drawn interpretation of what is seen and / or imagined were completely self-evident. It is therefore hardly surprising that drawing has always played such a fundamental role in times of artistic departure, such as can be seen in the examples of Paul Klee, Lee Lozano or Robert Crumb. Or to express it in the words of Vincent Van Gogh: "What does drawing mean? How does one start? It is nothing more than to pave the way through an invisible steel wall." [Antonin Artaud, quoted from a letter from Vincent Van Gogh in: Antonin Artaud, Śuvres complčtes, Vol. 30, p. 40, quoted from: Jaques Derrida, Aufzeichnungen eines Blinden, Munich 2008, p. 49 (Notes)]
With this in mind, we are looking forward to the latest results of perforated steel walls by Bill Adams, Claus Böhmler, Jesuis Crystiano and Joe Neave.(...)"

Text Inci Yilmaz
www.warhusrittershaus.com